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You are here : 3-RX.com > Drugs & Medications > Detailed Drug Information (USP DI) > Estrogens : Before Using

Estrogens (Systemic)

Estrogens | Before Using | Proper Use | Precautions | Side Effects | Additional Information

Before Using This Medicine

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For estrogens, the following should be considered:

Allergies - Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to estrogens. Also tell your health care professional if you are allergic to any other substances, such as foods, preservatives, or dyes.

Pregnancy - Estrogens are not recommended for use during pregnancy or right after giving birth. Becoming pregnant or maintaining a pregnancy is not likely to occur around the time of menopause.

Certain estrogens have been shown to cause serious birth defects in humans and animals. Some daughters of women who took diethylstilbestrol (DES) during pregnancy have developed reproductive (genital) tract problems and, rarely, cancer of the vagina or cervix (opening to the uterus) when they reached childbearing age. Some sons of women who took DES during pregnancy have developed urinary-genital tract problems.

Breast-feeding - Use of this medicine is not recommended in nursing mothers. Estrogens pass into the breast milk and their possible effect on the baby is not known.

Children - Use of this medicine before puberty is not recommended. Growth of bones can be stopped early. Girls and boys may develop growth of breasts. Girls may have vaginal changes, including vaginal bleeding.

Adolescents - This medicine may be used to start puberty in teenagers with some types of delayed puberty.

Older adults - This medicine has been tested and has not been shown to cause different side effects or problems in older women than it does in younger women.

Other medicines - Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking estrogens, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following:

  • Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or
  • Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or
  • Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or
  • Androgens (male hormones) or
  • Anti-infectives by mouth or by injection (medicine for infection) or
  • Antithyroid agents (medicine for overactive thyroid) or
  • Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol) or
  • Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or
  • Chloroquine (e.g., Aralen) or
  • Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or
  • Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or
  • Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or
  • Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or
  • Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or
  • Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or
  • Hydroxychloroquine (e.g., Plaquenil) or
  • Isoniazid or
  • Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or
  • Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or
  • Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or
  • Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or
  • Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen or
  • Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or
  • Phenytoin (e.g., Dilantin) or
  • Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or
  • Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene) - Use of these medicines with estrogens may increase the chance of problems occurring that affect the liver
  • Cyclosporine (e.g., Sandimmune) - Estrogens can prevent cyclosporine's removal from the body; this can lead to cyclosporine causing kidney or liver problems

Other medical problems - The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of estrogens. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

    For all patients
  • Blood clotting problems (or history of during previous estrogen therapy) - Estrogens usually are not used until blood clotting problems stop; using estrogens is not a problem for most patients without a history of blood clotting problems due to estrogen use
  • Asthma or
  • Calcium, too much or too little in blood or
  • Diabetes mellitus (sugar diabetes)
  • Epilepsy (seizures) or
  • Heart problems or
  • Kidney problems or
  • Liver tumors, benign or
  • Lupus erythematosus, systemic or
  • Migraine headaches - Estrogens may worsen these conditions.
  • Breast cancer or
  • Bone cancer or
  • Cancer of the uterus or
  • Fibroid tumors of the uterus - Estrogens may interfere with the treatment of breast or bone cancer or worsen cancer of the uterus when these conditions are present
  • Changes in genital or vaginal bleeding of unknown causes - Use of estrogens may delay diagnosis or worsen condition. The reason for the bleeding should be determined before estrogens are used
  • Endometriosis or
  • High cholesterol or triglycerides (or history of) or
  • Gallbladder disease or gallstones (or history of) or
  • Liver disease (or history of) or
  • Pancreatitis (inflammation of pancreas) or
  • Porphyria - Estrogens may worsen these conditions. Although estrogens can improve blood cholesterol, they can worsen blood triglycerides for some people
  • Hypothyroid (too little thyroid hormone) - Dose of thyroid medicine may need to be increased.
  • Vision changes, sudden onset including
  • Bulging eyes or
  • Double vision or
  • Migraine headache or
  • Vision loss, partial or complete - Estrogens may cause these problems. Tell your doctor if you have had any of these problems, especially while taking estrogen or oral contraceptives (“birth control pills”).

    For males treated for breast or prostate cancer
  • Blood clots or
  • Heart or circulation disease or
  • Stroke - Males with these medical problems may be more likely to have clotting problems while taking estrogens; the high doses of estrogens used to treat male breast or prostate cancer have been shown to increase the chances of heart attack, phlebitis (inflamed veins) caused by a blood clot, or blood clots in the lungs


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Estrogens: Description and Brand Names

 

Estrogens: Proper Use



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